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What is the origin of the primordial black holes in the solar system?

The origin of giant primordial black holes has remained a mystery for quite a long time. Not even astronomers seem to understand anything about them. That’s understandable because black holes have existed for quite a long time as far as the cosmological record is concerned. Therefore, unless new physics is discovered, the existing one lacks information to explain how they came into appearance.

However, there is an exciting research proposal about their origin. It states that the stars are not the sources of the first black holes. On the contrary, they originate from clumps of gravitinos, particles that are super-hypothetical and super-exotic. These particles might have survived the Bing Bang, especially the first challenging years of the same.

For quite a long time, it was believed that black holes came about after the big stars’ death. Given the massive size, the black hole they leave behind is often more prominent than the sun. Assumptions have it that the extra big black holes result from merging two or more small black holes. Others are big because of solar masses resulting from consuming as much gas as possible. The theory has been justified for quite some time. After all, they often occur amidst every galaxy in the cosmos, including the Milky Way. That includes even the supermassive black holes (SMBHs).

Nevertheless, there is something weird about this particular assumption. According to astronomers, there were massive black holes at or before even the galaxies and stars existed. They existed even before the universe was a billion years old. Therefore, there are high chances that they don’t result from stars’ death since that takes a long time. Going by the typical stellar death route, stars could take even hundreds of millions of years to die. Yet again, the supermassive black holes were there even with the very first stars and galaxies. There are high chances there was no time for the star to die and form black holes in the early universe.

That pokes holes in the existing theory of how black holes came to be, especially the supermassive ones. Do we really know much about the astrophysics surrounding the growth of the big black holes? Probably not, but time will tell.

There is also the gravitinos theory that is too weird at the moment. After all, no known physics covers its scope. That’s where the rest of the work is put on the shoulders of theoretical physicists. Fortunately, they are already working day and night to go beyond the existing physics. With the help of things like supersymmetry, it might be possible. It has a way of explaining how the particle world works inside and tell if there are brand-new particles in them.

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